Category Archives: Features

John Crerar: Industrialist, Bachelor Philanthropist, Library Founder

John Crerar
Submitted by Joel Schorn, ATLA Metadata Analyst

Like many of Chicago’s early prominent businesspeople, John Crerar came to that city from the Eastern United States. A partner in a railroad supply company, he arrived as a young man from his native New York in 1862. The following year he and J. McGregor Adams formed Crerar, Adams Co., which manufactured and sold railroad supplies and contractors’ materials. He was an incorporator of the Pullman Palace Car company, serving on its board until his death in 1889, and became a director of banks, railroads, and an insurance company. Active in the influential Commercial Club of Chicago, he served as a director or president of the Chicago Literary Club, the Chicago Historical Society, the YMCA, the American Sunday School Union, the Chicago Orphan Asylum, and the Presbyterian Hospital. He had a lifelong interest in books and learning and was a member and former president of the New York Mercantile Library.

The Last Ten Years of the Tenth Panchen Lama: Restructuring Buddhism in Tibet

Submitted by Antonio Terrone, PhD, ATLA East Asia Metadata Analyst

When one morning in October 1977 the Tenth Panchen Lama of Tibet (1938-1989) Chokyi Gyeltsen was released from the Qincheng Prison in Beijing, he had a mixed reputation among his fellow Tibetans. Some revered him as a spiritual leader at the top of Tibetan religious and political hierarchy, second only to the Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (the leader of Tibet until 1959 and already in India for nearly two decades at the time). Chokyi Gyeltsen was also the head of the influential Tashi Lhunpo monastery and the tenth in the prestigious Panchen Lama reincarnation lineage.

The SCOOP: Fair Use Week

Fair Use
Submitted by Christine Fruin, ATLA Scholarly Communication/Open Access Publishing Manager

The SCOOP, Scholarly COmmunication and Open Publishing, is a monthly column published to inform ATLA members of recent developments, new resources, or interesting stories from the realm of scholarly communication and open access publishing.

History of Fair Use Week

This year marks the fifth anniversary of Fair Use Week. Fair Use Week began in February 2014 at the suggestion of the Association of Research Libraries’ (ARL) “Fair Use Allies” group. Each year, libraries across the United States and Canada plan activities to educate and celebrate the importance of the copyright limitations of fair use and fair dealing. Fair Use Week 2018 occurs February 26 to March 2. During this time, libraries are encouraged to engage members of their communities through any of the following activities:

As Seen on Twitter: January 2018

The ATLA Twitter feed is filled with news on ATLA events and product updates as well as stories that have relevance to the work of libraries and librarians.

Here are some highlights from last month’s @YourATLA Twitter feed:

Digital Spotlight: Quadcast, a Yale Divinity School Podcast Series

quadcast
Submitted by Andy Carter, ATLA Digital Projects Manager

I recently discovered “The Quadcast,” a new podcast series from Yale Divinity School (YDS). Hosted on SoundCloud, and running about twenty minutes, each episode intends to “reflect on the future of religion in conversation with a member of the Yale Divinity School faculty.” The interviews are conducted by a current YDS graduate student.

Notes from the Road: Pitts Theology Library at Candler School of Theology, Emory University

Pitts Theology
Submitted by Christine Fruin, ATLA Scholarly Communication and Open Access Publishing Manager

While attending the Academy of Preachers Annual Festival in Atlanta, Georgia, I took a side trip to Pitts Theology Library to tour their beautiful space and chat with library staff to chat about copyright, open access, and ATLA’s scholarly communication program. Entry into the Candler School of Theology is on its own inspiring. The space is bright and inviting with granite and glass. The library space is equally beautiful and a peaceful place for scholarly study and collaboration.

A Scholar’s Experience at AAR/SBL: Feminist Hermeneutics of the Bible, Southeast Asia, and Women’s Breakfast

SBL
Submitted by May May Latt, ATLA Metadata Analyst

My paper entitled “The Community of Internally Displaced People/Diasporas: Esther 1:10-22 and 8:3-17” was accepted by the session of Feminist Hermeneutics of the Bible at Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) in Boston, 2017. The theme of the session was “Current Voices in Feminist Hermeneutics,” therefore it included comparative readings to the Bible in South African perspectives, Burmese perspectives, and intertextual studies of women in the Hebrew Bible.

The SCOOP: The Reformation of Section 108

Submitted by Christine Fruin, ATLA Scholarly Communication/Open Access Publishing Manager

The SCOOP, Scholarly COmmunication and Open Publishing, is a monthly column published by Christine Fruin, ATLA Scholarly Communication/Open Access Publishing Manager, to inform ATLA members of recent developments, new resources, or interesting stories from the realm of scholarly communication and open access publishing.

The Internet Archive (https://archive.org) has been a digital library innovator for more than 20 years, often pushing the boundaries of copyright law, including fair use, in the important effort of providing “universal access to all knowledge.” Last fall, the Internet Archive announced a new project that would take advantage of a rarely used subsection of the Copyright Act’s §108, which is the exception permitting reproduction by libraries and archives of copyrighted works for purposes such as preservation and providing personal copies to patrons.

Pack Horse Libraries Brought Books to Remote Mountain Areas of Kentucky

Pack Horse
Submitted by Joel Schorn, ATLA Metadata Analyst

In 1930s eastern Kentucky books were hard to come by. The state circulated only one book per person, far below the American Library Association’s then standard of five to ten. On top of that, up to 31 percent of people in the region were illiterate.

Books not only would provide the materials to help residents learn to read. They would also offer people a remedy to the crippling poverty of the Depression and equip them to respond to the uncertainties and opportunities that industrialization was bringing to eastern Kentucky. Without a base of available libraries, however, all of this was difficult to accomplish.

The SCOOP: We are ALL Scholarly Communications Librarians

Scoop
Submitted by Christine Fruin, ATLA Scholarly Communication/Open Access Publishing Manager

The SCOOP, Scholarly COmmunication and Open Publishing, is a monthly column published to inform ATLA members of recent developments, new resources, or interesting stories from the realm of scholarly communication and open access publishing.

The Organizational Ends of ATLA state that ATLA exists so that “…information professionals have the tools they need for robust scholarly communication in the fields of theology and religion.” This declaration recognizes not only the increasing need of librarians to be versed in scholarly communication issues but also ATLA’s commitment to supporting librarians in achieving competency in this area.

Skip to toolbar